My Quest for Nigeria’s Rebirth elucidates on the nitty-gritty of our sociopolitical and economic problems, and the onus of the book centres on the transparency and accountability of leaders and the utilisation of our God’s given potential to ensure the realisation of the good society.

Recently, I received a copy of My Quest for Nigeria’s Rebirth written by our egbon, an astute accountant and savvy political analyst, Mr Bolutife Oluwadele (PhD). I quickly read through the entire book, which flows as the deeply researched advice of an expert in economics and accountancy on how to turn the lot of our great country around, and to pole position. Interestingly, even though the author currently resides in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, he couldn’t be more rooted in the reality of his homeland beleagured by need and dysfunction, and his patriotic zeal that drives this unique advocacy for change – the real and not cosmetic one proclaimed so often – comes across so forcefully.

Mr Bolutife Oluwadele’s new book is a thought-provoking one that serves as another essential prescription for Nigeria’s numerous, self-inflicted, and seemingly intractable problems. The arguments in the book are carefully Marshalled from chapter to chapter in a manner thats cuts straight to the chase and enables quick comprehension. Even then, the astuteness of the analysis and propositions are anything but pedestrian. In this intellectual tour de force put together by Oluwadele, a resounding counsel that shines through is the advice for Nigerians to use what they have to get what they want and stop being saboteurs of their own collective future.

From nuts and bolts expositions on budgeting to bookkeeping and accounting for sustainable growth and development in our economy, Mr Oluwadele elucidates upon and prescribes what we need to do to grow on our income as a people and country. But then, the big and pertinent question is: Will the stakeholders in our political and economic spheres, and beyond, embrace the counsel given in this resourceful distillation, for the good of society?

My Quest for Nigeria’s Rebirth elucidates on the nitty-gritty of our sociopolitical and economic problems, and the onus of the book centres on the transparency and accountability of leaders and the utilisation of our God’s given potential to ensure the realisation of the good society. The author calls for the painstaking reordering of our social and moral codes and values – particularly from our beautiful past, and for these to be re-inculcated towards the reoreintation of our worldview from the mire it is caught up in presently.

The author speaks to the pervasive and crosscutting notion of the “Kabiyesi,” i.e., “He who nobody can query or demand accountability from” in most of us in Africa as the crucial bane of our leadership. To him, there is a huge moral and practical need to this dictatorial outlook and tendency down, for Africa to start reaching its potentials.

In a nutshell, and quite unfortunately, you will never understand a typical Nigerian/African – even the one claiming a great public purpose or even spewing out Messiahnic rhetoric – until you give him or her power or authority. And then the nightmare starts. As Oluwadele puts it: “Even normal queries that are officially designed to seek clarification about dereliction of duty, other misconduct of subordinations, an unusual occurrence, etc. (are)…turned to a massive weapon of intimidation and oppression in the hands of the authoritarian bosses in the workplace.”

If Nigeria and the larger Africa must move forward and break the hold of economic stagnation, we must scrap the unworthy legacy and convention of political brigandage, corruption, and moral bankruptcy, which are prevalent across the continent.

I am highly impressed by the simple and clear messaging of the impeccable chartered accountant throughout this book. The author proves his invaluable knowledge of budgeting and accounting as essential in reengineering the fortunes of our country through the activities of governmental agencies, the private sector, and individuals. There are endless possibilities and opportunities in Nigeria. But, unfortunately, the chronic greed and corrupt practices of everyone have cummulatively impeded the growth and development of our country.

I will urge each and everyone to seek our copies of My Quest for Nigeria’s Rebirth from Amazon and other retailers to gain from the deep insights that Oluwadele has marshalled as a way out of the economic and political quicksands that Nigeria is currently trapped in but can get out of with the right amount of information/knowledge, commitment to change and hardwork.

Yahaya Balogun wrote from the United States of America.

Support PREMIUM TIMES’ journalism of integrity and credibility Good journalism costs a lot of money. Yet only good journalism can ensure the possibility of a good society, an accountable democracy, and a transparent government. For continued free access to the best investigative journalism in the country we ask you to consider making a modest support to this noble endeavour. By contributing to PREMIUM TIMES, you are helping to sustain a journalism of relevance and ensuring it remains free and available to all. Donate

TEXT AD: To advertise here . Call Willie +2347088095401…

Click Here To Drop Your Comment